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Wiki+ page: The Basics of Combat

On this page we will discuss the basics involving combat: supplies needed, determining battle, avoiding battle, participants and spectators, battle situations, active and defensive rounds, and end of combat. This page will only give the basics. For more in-depth coverage of the battle mechanics, you will want to check out the other pages in this section.

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1. Supplies Needed

Below are a list of supplies you will need to properly carry out a full fledged battle. You should already have these supplies. If you do not have these supplies you may wish to get them before continuing any further.

  • You will need a battle map. You can use paper, poster board, cardboard, cereal boxes, or whatever you can draw on as long as it is flat. Many game and hobby shops will sell battle mats on vinyl that are already marked in hex or square grids. If you have to make your own battle map, you will want to make sure that you draw on it hex or square grids that are uniform in size throughout the entire map. These are very important since movement is done by hex or block as is weapon and skill ranges and area of effects. You do not have to have any terrain identifiers. If you wish to add terrain to your battle map, you can draw them out. If you make or use pre-made terrain sets that your characters are intended to walk or move over, you will need to make sure to represent the same square or hex grids on those terrain sets.
  • You will need something to identify every participant on the battlefield. You can use coins, marbles, rocks, caps, or whatever as long as each one is somewhat unique to help identify the different participant. Each identifier needs to have a distinguishable front side as well. You also can use pewter figurines from other rpg's or combat games. You will want to make sure that you have enough identifiers to meet every battle situation need.
  • You will need a set of polygonal dice. You will primarily need a set of percentile dice and possibly a d20, however, it is a good idea to have all of the other dice as well.
  • You will want paper and a pencil to record stats and battle information. It is a good idea to let the players take care of their own character's stats while the GM takes care of any NPC's. At a minimum you will want to record HP, SA, EP, DP, and Battle Actions, as these stats will constantly be affected in battle.
  • It is a good idea to have a calculator. It will be even better if each player has his or her own calculator, but you will most likely want at least one calculator. You will be doing a lot quick math and a calculator will not only help to speed things up but will also help to ensure correct answers and preserve your sanity. Crafty players and GM's may also make spreadsheets that help with battle.

 

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2. Determining Battle

It is important to understand why the battle is taking place. The most common cause for a battle is that it is story driven. That is the battle takes place because of an event in the story. However the battle may be an effect of your character’s actions. Perhaps you provoked another character. The other reason for a battle is that it is a random battle. A random battle is best described as a bad luck encounter. Basically, because of your bad luck, you accidentally got to close to a den of hungry beasts, who smelling you decided to attack you. Of course, a random battle is not really random, as in enemies appearing out of no where. Random battles are instead more like the battle that was not expected or the surprise encounter.

A GM may never decide to use a random encounter, or the GM may decide to use the random encounter constantly. The GM may also only decide to use a random encounter depending upon where your character is at. When determining a random battle, the GM will ask the players to make a luck check. If the player succeeds, then that means the player was lucky enough to escape being attacked by some beast that is nearby. If the player fails, a battle will start, and this will always be a full-fledged battle. If there are more than one players in a team, then it will be the greater which decides. Basically, everyone will make a luck check. If more players succeeds then those that fails, then there will be no battle. Otherwise if more players fail then those that succeed, there will be a battle.

Once a battle is determined, there are a few more situations to consider. Those would be the players trying to avoid a battle, who is participating, are their any spectators, and the different types of battle situations the players may find themselves in.
 

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3. Avoiding Battle

It is possible that you may wish to avoid the battle, once it was determined that there would be a battle.

  • Story Driven Battle: Since this battle is completely driven by the story, you can use story and role play to try and get out of fighting. Keeping it all in character, you can try to reason with your opponent and work things out peacefully. It should be understood that it all depends on your opponent and who is playing your opponent. The GM may let you make an influence check here to help determine if you were successful.
  • Cause and Effect Battle: This battle is always an effect of something you did, so it will be harder to get out of. However, you can still try. You can try bribing the opponent, or reasoning with the opponent. The GM may let you make an influence check here.
  • Random Encounter Battle: There may not be a way out of this battle. Instead, you should confer with your GM to see what he or she will allow and what is possible.

 

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4. Participants & Spectators

Participants and spectators are the characters that are involved, one way or another, with the battle.
 

4.1. Participants

Participants are the characters that are directly involved in the battle. They can be divided into two groups, attackers or defenders.

  • Attackers are who instigated the battle. In a random battle this will always be the creatures that attacked the unsuspecting party. The players will be the attackers if they started the battle by attacking the target first.
  • Defenders are the ones who initially are being attacked, causing the battle to start. In a random encounter, the players are always the defenders.

If you are part of the defending party, you are always a defender even when attacking.

 

4.2. Spectators

Spectators are any characters, be they players or NPC's or other creatures that are not in the battle but can see or effect the battle, and possibly can be seen by the participants of the battle.

Spectators are able to affect the battle just as if they were participants. They can target the participants with any number of long range skills, spells, or weapons and their yelling and taunts can distracted the participants. Spectators do have to be careful though, because they can be drawn into the battle, and thus becoming participants, if they are seen and attacked by the participants.
 

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5. Battle Situations

Once you have determined that there is going to be a battle and just who is involved in the battle, it will be time to figure out what kind of battle situation it will be.

Battle Situations determine how the participants will be placed on the battlefield. In other words, how you will place your characters on the battle mat. Your GM may decide to roll a dice to determine the battle situation, or may simply pick a battle situation that bests fits the environment and the participants. Should your GM decide to roll a dice, he or she would either roll a 1d5 (one five-sided dice) or a 1d10 (one ten-sided dice) as if it were a 1d5. The GM would then take that number and choose from the chart below.

Battle Situations Table: Use this table to determine the battle situation and to know what the battle situations are

Number Rolled Battle Situation Description
1 Regular Combat This is regular combat. Both parties will place their identifiers as desired.
2 Attacking Team Pincer Here the defending team will place their identifiers first. The attacking team will then place their identifiers on two opposite sides of the defending team. There needs to be at least two members of the attacking team for this situation to be used.
3 Attacking Team Surround Here the defending team will place their identifiers first. The attacking team will then place their identifiers to surround the defending team on all sides. There needs to be at least three members of the attacking team for this situation to be used.
4 Defending Team Pincer Here the attacking team will place their identifiers first. The defending team will then place their identifiers on two opposite sides of the attacking team. There needs to be at least two members of the defending team for this situation to be used.
5 Defending Team Surround Here the attacking team will place their identifiers first. The defending team will then place their identifiers to surround the attacking team on all sides. There needs to be at least three members of the defending team for this situation to be used.

 Understanding how to place your identifiers may be a bit difficult. Here are some examples on how to place your identifier based on the battle situation.

Attacking Team Pincher Example

enemypincherexample.png

 

Here is an example on how to place your character’s identifiers if you are involved in an attacking team pincer situation. The red represents the attacking team and the blue represents the defending team.This illustration shows that the attacking team must and can only place their identifiers on two opposite sides of the defending team. The defending team has to place their identifiers first, and the GM should have them be placed towards the center of the battle mat so that there is enough room for the attacking team to be placed appropriately. This illustration only gives one possible example of placement in this situation.

Attacking Team Surround Example

enemysurroundexample.png

 

Here is an example on how to place your character’s identifiers if you are involved in an attacking team surround situation. The red represents the attacking team and the blue represents the defending team.This illustration shows that the attacking team must and can only place their identifiers on all sides of the defending team, to surround them. The defending team has to place their identifiers first, and the GM should have them be placed towards the center of the battle mat so that there is enough room for the attacking team to be placed appropriately. This illustration only gives one possible example of placement in this situation.

Defending Team Pincher Example

partypincherexample.png

 

Here is an example on how to place your character’s identifiers if you are involved in a defending team pincer situation. The red represents the attacking team and the blue represents the defending team.This illustration shows that the defending team must and can only place their identifiers on two opposite sides of the attacking team. The attacking team has to place their identifiers first, and the GM should have them be placed towards the center of the battle mat so that there is enough room for the defending team to be placed appropriately. This illustration only gives one possible example of placement in this situation.

Defending Team Surround Example

partysurroundexample.png

 

Here is an example on how to place your character’s identifiers if you are involved in a defending team surround situation. The red represents the attacking team and the blue represents the defending team.This illustration shows that the defending team must and can only place their identifiers on all sides of the attacking team, to surround them. The attacking team has to place their identifiers first, and the GM should have them be placed towards the center of the battle mat so that there is enough room for the defending team to be placed appropriately. This illustration only gives one possible example of placement in this situation.

When involved in a regular battle situation, you can place your identifiers anywhere on the battle map.

 

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6. The Flow of Battle: Active and Defensive Rounds

Now that everything is set up for battle, it is time to actually begin the fight! But how do we know who's turn it is, what we can do, and when we can do it?

The way battle works is really pretty simple. Battle turns take place in what are called rounds. A round is a time frame that takes up 10 seconds of game time in which everyone from both the defending party and the attacking party have all had a turn. Once everyone has had their turn, a new round starts. This continues until the battle is finished.

Each round is further divided into Active and Defense Rounds. The active round is the part of the round in which your character can act, move about, attack, and so on. The defensive round is the part of the round in which your character can only defend. Active and Defense Rounds are further explained on their own pages.

Before the battle can even begin though, we have to decide who goes when. 

6.1. Determining Initiative

Determining initiative, or turn order, is simple. Everyone simply rolls a 1d20 and adds their Initiative stat to what is rolled. The person with the highest number goes first. That person is followed by who ever has the next highest initiative, who is followed by the person with the next highest initiative, and so forth, until everyone has gotten a chance to go. So if your Initiative is 4 and you rolled a 10, you'd have an initiative of 14. If the enemy had a total initiative of 10, you would go before that enemy in battle. If the enemy's total initiative was 15, the enemy would get to go before you would.

Now if any two or more characters have the same total initiative, they would do a second initiative roll to determine who gets to go before who. The highest roll would get to go first, followed by the second highest roll. If the same number is rolled, the two players would have to roll again.

Familiars, pets, and livestock all use the initiative of their owner, even if that familiar or pet has an initiative stat.

Once you have determined the turn order, or the initiative, of each participant, the battle begins.

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7. End of Combat

Eventually the battle will end with hopefully you on the winning side of it. Should you be defeated in a duel, you will have no rewards, except for anything you stole from your opponent or any skill points earned. A battle is over when either you kill your opponent, you are killed, the enemy surrenders and you accept, or you surrender and your enemy accepts. There is no retreat from a duel. Once the battle is over you or your GM will need to determine the Spoils of Battle. You should also understand the many faces of defeat that do not end in death. 

If you are in a duel, the battle can end with you defeating the enemy, the enemy surrendering and you accepting it, the enemy defeating you, or you surrendering and the enemy accepting it. The duel can also end and become a normal battle if more participants join the fight.

7.1. Victory

Victory for you is if you are on the winning side when the battle ends. This could mean that you and your allies have defeated all of the enemy targets, or that the enemies have fled, or that they have surrendered. Should you be victorious, you will get to partake in the spoils of battle.

There are many different spoils that can be won during and at the end of battle.

  • Skill Points: You will gain skill points anytime you use a skill. If you use a skill successfully you will get skill points at your success rate. If you fail while attempting to use a skill, you will get skill points at your failure rate. Either way, you will constantly get skill points as long as you try to use a skill, mastered or not, and you will keep these skill points whether or not you win the battle.
  • Stat Points or Character Points: You do not get stat points or character points from defeating enemies at the end of combat, unless your GM decides to give some to you. Instead, the GM will decide on how many character points to give you at the end of the play session based on your performance during the play session, which may or may not include defeating enemies. This is done this way so that the focus on the game is role play and not combat.
  • Money: Some enemy targets will carry money. Once you kill the target you can search the body for any money that character may have and take that money for your reward. You do not have to wait until the end of battle to loot bodies. You can loot any body you are standing no more than one hex or square from as long as the body is dead. You can also use a stealing skill to attempt to steal money from living targets. It takes a full round to loot a body and can only be done in the active round or at the end of battle.
  • Treasure or Equipment: Like money, some enemy targets will have other treasures or equipment for you to loot. You do not have to wait until the end of battle to loot a dead body, you just have to be within one hex or square of the target. You can use a stealing skill to attempt to pick off some loot from a living target as well. Some treasure may not be able to be obtained from the target until it is dead. Some treasure may even be parts of the target, such as a rare shell or a certain rare alchemical ingredient. It takes a full round to loot a body and can only be done in the active round or at the end of battle.

 

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8. Defeat

Defeat does not always mean death. There are other forms of defeat where you can still live. You just won’t get the glory of a victorious battle. The other ways you can suffer defeat are if you retreat from battle or if you surrender and your enemy accepts.

  • Retreat From Battle: To escape a battle, simply move to the edge of the battlefield and announce that you are escaping. If any enemy targets try to pursue you, you would need to make a speed check to see if you can escape, otherwise you simply escape and become a spectator.
  • Surrender: You can only surrender when facing an intelligent opponent, usually the case in a cause and effect or story driven battle. You can plead and even offer up some money or other valuables to surrender. It will then be up to your GM or the player playing your opponent to accept or deny your surrender. If the opponent denies your surrender, the battle will continue. If the opponent accepts your surrender, the battle ends.

Of course the battle ends in defeat if you and your allies are all killed.

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Wiki+ page: The Active Round

The Active Round is when you can act. This is portion of the round when you can move, attack, use skills, spells, and items. The active round lasts until you have completed your movements.

1. Actions

While in the Active Round, you make make use of the following combat actions: Attack, Support, and Magic. Furthermore you get 1 movement action to move across the battlefield.

The amount of actions that you have does not indicate how many times you can do something. For example, if your character has 2 Attack Actions, that does not mean that your character can attack twice. That simply means that your character can perform a move that would take 2 Attack Actions within the round.

During your active round, you can do the following:

  • Attack: You can attack once. This attack can be a simple attack or an offensive skill. A simple attack costs 1 attack action while an offensive skill might cost more than 1 attack action. If you wish to perform a skill that costs more attack actions than your character has, you start the skill but do not perform it until the required attack actions have been spent. Basically, if you wish to use an attack skill that costs 2 attack actions, but you only have 1 attack action, it will take you two rounds to do said skill, whereas if you had 2 attack actions you can perform that skill immediately. Once you have performed an attack action, you cannot attack again that round even if you have attack actions left over.
  • Move: You can move once during your active round. The distance you can move is based on your character's battle movement rate. Once you have moved, you cannot move again that round. If you have not used all of your movement rate and have stopped to attack, you still cannot move to complete your movement rate. Once you have stopped moving your movement action is done for that round.
  • Support: You can make one support movement per round. This might be to use a potion, change equipment, or use a support skill. Support skills will cost support actions. Once you have performed a support action, you cannot perform another one that round even if you have support actions left over.
  • Magic: You can cast one spell per round. If you wish to cast a spell that costs more magic actions than your character has, you start the spell but do not perform it until the required magic actions have been spent. Basically, if you wish to use a spell that costs 2 magic actions, but you only have 1 magic action, it will take you two rounds to do said spell, whereas if you had 2 magic actions you can perform that spell immediately.

You cannot hold actions until the end of the round. When it is your turn, you either act or skip your turn.

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2. Attacking

Unlike in many other games, you do not have to make a "To Hit" roll to make a melee hit. You simply declare that you are attacking with a melee weapon or your fist or foot. Legends of Nor'Ova does not assume that the target is always moving and you can easily hit a stationary target with a melee attack. The target would need to purposefully evade the attack.
However, if you are using a projectile weapon or throwing a weapon, you will need to make an Aim check to hit the target, even if the target is stationary. GM's who perfer a "To Hit" system could use Aim as a "To Hit" roll if desired.

Attacking is simply the act of attacking an enemy target with your weapon. It is very straight forward as there is no roll needed to make just to preform a single attack. You simply need to be within range and declare that you are attacking the enemy target and the damage that you will do to the target. It will be up to the target to defend or evade.

Each time you use a single attack, you spend 1 attack action.

The damage you do is depending upon the weapon you use. For example, if you are using a hand-held weapon, you would add your melee power to your weapon’s damage value and that would be the total damage you will deal to your enemy target. If it is a bow and arrow then you would add bow power to the weapon’s combined damage value (bow damage value plus arrow damage value) to determine how much damage you are going to do to the enemy target. If it is a thrown weapon, you add your throw power to the weapon’s damage value and that would be the total damage. For other kinds of weapons such as guns and crossbows, you would simply give their damage values because you would not have any strength based damage value to add to the weapon’s damage value.

  • Melee Power: This is used with any hand-held weapons. It is also used if you are punching or kicking.
  • Throw Power: This is used when you throw something.
  • Bow Power: This is used when you use a bow and arrow.

There are also dual wielding and two-handed weapons which can give you a bonus to your attack.

  • Dual Wielding: You are using two weapons at the same time with one attack. You need to have the dual wielding ability for the weapons you wish to dual wield to do this.
  • 2-Handed Weapons: Wielding a 2-Handed weapon allows you to apply Melee Power twice. Therefore your attack would be Melee Power + Melee Power + Weapon Damage.

That is the very basics of attacking.

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3. Criticals

There are three types of criticals: critical success, critical failure, and critical hits.

Critical Success: Critical Success applies when using a skill or a spell and you roll a 001. Critical Successes double the point value effect of the skill or spell and double your success rate of skill points.

Critical Failure: Critical Failure applies when using a skill or a spell and you roll a 100. Critical Failure causes you to lose double your success rate worth of points from your skill or spell. If the skill or spell is an offensive or healing skill or spell, it could potentially do something more. To determine this, roll a 1d6.

  • Rolling a 1: If you roll a 1 on the 1d6 roll, you somehow still manage to preform the skill or spell as intended. This is considered a lucky break because despite how badly you failed, it still worked. You would still lose double your success rate from that skill's mastery, but at least it worked.
  • Rolling a 6: Rolling a 6 on a 1d6 is the worst possible fail. Typically this means that the skill or spell did opposite of what you intended. Maybe you meant to heal your friend with Essence Bolt, but instead you injured your friend more. Maybe you tried to cast Earthen Angers at an enemy but instead cast it at an ally or yourself. Maybe you tried to do a 2-Hit Combo, but you failed so bad you hurt yourself in the process. Obviously the effects can vary with the situation and depend upon the GM to decide what happens here.
  • Rolling a 2 - 5: Any roll besides a 1 or a 6 is simply a fail with you loosing double your success rate from that skill or spell's mastery.

Critical Hits: A critical hit is where you do more than normal damage against a target. You would refer to either your character's Critical Hit % or Critical Magic %. If the attack is a physical attack, you would refer to Critical Hit %. If the attack is a magical attack, you would refer to Critical Magic %. If you succeed at making either, the damage your character dealt is increased by x 1.25. If you make a critical success with your critical hit check, the damage is increased by x 1.5, also known as a double critical. 

Critical Hit Example

Let's say you are using the skill Trained Attack. Trained Attack's mastery is at 10% and your Critical Hit % is at 15%. If you roll a 12 trying to use Trained Attack, you failed at Trained Attack. Even though it would have been a critical hit, the failure to perform the skill means you automatically failed to make a critical hit. So you would simply do a normal hit. If you rolled an 8, you would have succeeded at Trained Attack and it would have been a critical hit.

The way you check for a Critical Hit % or Critical Magic % depends on what your character is doing. If your character is not using any skill or spell and is just hitting the enemy with a weapon you would roll the percentile dice with your attack. If your roll is equal to or below your character's Critical Hit %, you perform a critical hit. Otherwise it is a normal hit. So if your character's Critical Hit % is 20 and you roll a 21, it is a normal hit, but if you rolled a 20 (or lower) it is a critical hit.

If your character is using a skill or a spell though you do not need to make a separate roll to check for a critical hit. Instead, if your character's successful roll to use the skill or spell is also below or equal to your character's Critical Hit % (or Critical Magic % if a spell is being used), you automatically do a critical hit.

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4. The View Cone

When you attack you can only attack to your front, unless you are using a skill that states otherwise. Therefore you will need to have some way of identifying the front of your character’s identifier on the battle map. Not only can you attack only to your front, but also if you attack another target to their back sides or out of their view range that lessens their ability to evade or defend against your attack. The following illustration should help you understand the different sides of a character as seen on a battle map.

View Cone Example

frontalviewandsidesexample.png

 

The red cones represent the view fields if the character is looking straight to the front. It does not represent the view distances. Any block or hex that is identified as a front block or hex would be where that character could attack and have normal defense and evade chances if attacked from there. Unless the character has a skill that allows the character to attack to the sides or behind, that character will only be able to attack to the front.

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5. Dealing With Hidden and Covered Targets

If you cannot see an enemy, you cannot attack that enemy - unless of course you are using Blind Shot. Instead, you must first make a perception check to spot the enemy that is hiding, applying any penalties that may exist, which the GM will tell you about.

If the enemy is hidden behind an obstacle, the enemy is considered covered. You would first have to be on the same side of the obstacle as the enemy is. If the enemy is also hiding you will need to then make your perception checks. You simply cannot hit an enemy beyond or through an obstacle unless you are using an area of effect skill or spell that goes beyond the obstacle, which is up to GM discretion.

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6. Using Skills and Spells

Using Skills and Spells is another action you can make during the active round. For the most part, this is pretty straight forward. You simply use the skill or spell by making the mastery check, and the describe what the skill or spell does. Some skills or spells will do damage, some will cause status effects, some will heal, and some will benefit you or your allies. You will need to spend the action costs and stat point costs, whether you are successful or not at using the skill or spell, and yes you can use minor elemental manipulations.

Perhaps the most confusing aspect of a spell or skill is the skill's area’s of effect. If a skill lists its area of effect as one by one (1 x 1) hex around the user, you would count out one hex from your identifier, all around your identifier, and the skill or spell would only affect those in the radius of the skill or spell. If you are using a square grid battle map, you simply substitute the word hex for the word square. It would still be 1 x 1 squares around the user. Here is an illustration on a 1x1 hex around the user.

1x1 Hex Area of Effect Example

radiusexample.png

 

As this example shows, even enemy targets can be in your radius of effect. If the skill affects all targets within the area of effect, then all targets will be affected, ally, enemy, and even you. If the skill is beneficial, the enemy will get that benefit. If the skill is harmful, your allies, and possibly even you, will get harmed. Sometimes however the skill will specifically say it only affects allies or enemies, so you need to understand the skill carefully and take a look at all who will be affected, before using the skill.

If the area of effect is larger than 1x1 hex around the user, you simply count out more hexes outward. Here is an example of an area of effect that is 2x2 hex around the user.

2x2 Hex Area of Effect Example

largerradiusexample.png

 

The green highlight shows the original example of 1x1 hex around the user. The purple highlight shows the radius expanded by 1 for 2x2 hex around the user. More targets are potentially effected in this example because the area of effect for this skill is larger.

The same rules apply if you are using a skill that has an area of effect but you can target the skill on another target, presumably an enemy target. Instead of counting outward from your identifier, you would count outward from the target’s identifier. Of course some area of effect skills may be able to be targeted around allies and not enemy targets or yourself.

Placed Radius Area of Effect Example

placedradiusexample.png

 

Some skills can be placed and even have a range as to how far the center of the skill’s area of effect can be placed. For example, if a skill has a range of 5 hex and an area of effect of 1x1 hex, then you would count out five hexes from you to place the center of the skill, and 1 hex away from the center of the skill around the center.

Some skills or spells do not really have an area of effect but only work in a straight line or affect every target in a straight line. This is a straight line of all connecting hexes or squares from your identifier going in the direction that you are facing. The straight line cannot skip over any hexes or squares and cannot bulge, and must be in a perfect straight line. Here is an illustration of a straight line effect from one possible direction.

Straight Line Effect Example

straightlineeffectexample.png

 

As illustrated by this example, a straight line effect spell or skill will only be able to make diagonal lines on a hex grid battle map with only making horizontal or vertical lines on a square grid battle map. It is important to understand that a straight line effect has to be able to effect all hexes or squares in a straight line in order to work properly.

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7. Movement

Another activity you can take part in during your active round is movement. For the most part, movement is rather simple. You can move once during your active round. The distance you can move is based on your character's battle movement rate. Once you have moved, you cannot move again that round. If you have not used all of your movement rate and have stopped to attack, you still cannot move to complete your movement rate. Once you have stopped moving your movement action is done for that round.

Simple yes? You simply move your character's battle movement rate to the location on the battle map you want to go. But there are a few special situations that you should know about.

7.1. Sprinting

Typically, you can only move your character's battle movement rate during your character's active round. But what if you need to get somewhere in a hurry? You can sprint. Sprinting is a short run which allows your character to travel farther than he or she normally would during your active round. Every character can sprint. You simply need to spend the energy to do so. Sprinting allows you to move at double your character's battle movement rate at a cost of 5 EP per use.

7.2. Crawling

Imagine, if you will, a battlefield with obstacles that you can duck behind to hide from those pesky silver imps and their deadly accurate crossbows. Now what if you wanted to try to move while remaining low enough to still be covered by the obstacle? You can do so by crawling. Crawling allows you to move at half your battle movement rate while remaining low to the ground.

7.3. Flying

Some races are blessed with the ability of flight and some spells also grant this ability. Flying is incredibly useful as in most cases it allows you to move across the battlefield at three times your battle movement rate spending only a small amount of EP. However, flying might not always be possible in every battle. Before you try to fly, you need to make sure with the GM that the environment will allow your character to fly. In order to make use of the flying movement bonus, your character must be able to fly over most obstacles. However, if your character can't fly, that doesn't mean that you can't make use of your wings to aide in movement. Maybe you can also glide, or at least use your wings to give a small movement bonus? Check with your GM, surely he or she will be able to work with you to help make the best use of your character's unique ability.

7.4. Obstacles

Battlefields are rarely empty, sparse plains. Oftentimes they are filled with all kinds of obstacles such as water, debris, stairs, pit holes, trees, and so forth. Sometimes you may need to climb to deal with the obstacle. Other times you may need to swim. Finally, some obstacles cannot be surpassed. When dealing with obstacles that require climbing or swimming, refer to the rules for such in the general gameplay rules section.

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8. Support Actions

Support Actions is another type of activity that you can make during your active round. You can make one support movement per round. This might be to use a potion, change equipment, or use a support skill. Support skills will cost support actions. Once you have performed a support action, you cannot perform another one that round even if you have support actions left over.

As far as using items is concerned, a support action covers both getting the potion and drinking the potion, all in one action. If you are appling a poison on your weapon, that will take 2 support actions.

If you are wanting to use a potion on an ally, you need to be one hex away from that ally and facing that ally. If you are farther awy, you will need to either move or to throw using your support action (2 support actions). If you throw a potion, every target in the path or next to the path of the thrown item can make a free action check to catch the item, including the intended target. The first person in the path to catch the item gets the item. If no one succeeds to catch the item, it is considered a wasted item. 

It also is considered a support action to change your equipment. It costs 1 support action per piece of equipment you wish to change. You can declare changing several pieces of equipment and if you have enough support actions your character will complete this action during your active round.

You do not need to use support actions to reload your projectile weapons unless the projectile weapon declares that you do.

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Wiki+ page: The Defensive Round

When it is not actively your turn to act in combat, you are in what is called the Defensive Round In a defensive round you can not do anything except participate in story interaction and defend yourself against attacks. You cannot move, use items, use skills, cast spells, use minor runic manipulations, or attack. You can only defend, evade, or use defensive skills, including counter attack.

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1. Defense Actions

When in the defensive round, you only have your defense actions that you can use. Unlike the actions you have in the active round

When in active round, you have your attack, support, and magic actions. Those actions replenish every round and you can only do one of each regardless of how many actions you have. However in the defensive round you only have your defense actions and you can use all of your defensive actions. So if your character has 3 defensive actions and gets attacked 3 times, your character can use each of those three actions to try to defend against the attack. However if your character gets attacked a fourth time your character will not have any defensive actions left to defend with.

though, you can use all of your defensive actions. This is so that you can defend against multiple enemies and attacks.

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2. Defending

In order to defend against an attack, you have to use the skill Defense, or Magic Defense if you are defending against a magic attack. You simply do what the skill says to do.
 

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3. Evading

Whenever you are attacked you have a chance to evade. If you make your evade % check, you will usually evade the attack and receive no damage. You use Evade % for evading any damage, however depending upon the type of damage dealt your character may have a harder time evading. This is shown by applying handicaps to your character's Evade %. The penalties for the different evasion situations are found in the Special Defense Situations table.

Each time you attempt to evade costs a defense action. It is not free action.

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4. Special Defense Situations

There are situations which can affect how well you or your enemy target can defend or evade. Because of your limited cone of vision whenever an enemy target attacks you from a location outside of your frontal cone of vision, your chances at making a defense decrease. You are still able to defend, evade, or even use a defensive skill, however because you are being attacked outside of your field of vision, you react slower to the attack which decreases your ability to defend. These situations are attacked from behind, attacked from the side, or attacked while distracted, and they can apply to enemy targets as well.

Other situations make it difficult to defend against an attack as well. For example, a projectile attack could be near impossible to evade, but would not hinder your chance at making a defense check, whereas a covert attack could make it so that you could not even have a chance to make a defense check. Below is a table describing all of the various special defense situation.

Special Defense Situations Table: Shows the situations which could decrease your chances of defending or evading.

Defense Situation Description of Situation Effect on Defensive Strategy
Direct Melee Attack from the Front or Thrown Object
(Thrown Object is not Throwning  Weapons but objects and weapons not meant for throwing)
A basic attack coming from the frontal view of your character. No effect, changes, or penalties.
Attack From Behind or while distracted. Any attack coming from behind your character, or while you are distracted. Requires a successful perception check; there is a penalty of -5 to any defensive action, including evade.
Attack From the Side Any attack coming from the left or right of your character. A penalty of -5 to any defensive action.
Most Projectiles (including Rune Cannons) and Throwing Weapons (weapons meant for throwing) Defending or evading against a projectile shot from a bow, crossbow, or other basic projectile weapons except guns A penalty of -20 to Evade %.
Gun Defending or evading against a projectile shot from a gun. A penalty of -50 to Evade %
Explosions or Large Areas of Effect Defending or evading against any area of effect attack that covers more than one hex. Cannot evade unless you are on the farthest reach of the attack. If so, you can make an Evade check with no penalty.
Seen Single Target Spells Evading any spell that affects only a single target and can be seen. No effect, changes, or penalties.
Invisible or Very Fast Single Target Spells Evading any spell that affects only a single target and either cannot be seen or is extremely fast. A penalty of -25 to Evade %. Can make a Mental check where a success decreases the penalty by half and a critical success removes the penalty.
Covert Attacks Defending or evading against any hard to notice attack. Must make a successful perception check with any penalties given by the skill in use before you can make any defensive action.

 

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5. Defensive Skills

There are certain skills that you can use to help you defend while in your defensive round. There are also skills that you can use to help your allies defend. As long as the skill is a defensive skill, you can use it during your defensive round. The skill must cost defense actions to be able to be used in the defensive round.
 

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6. Defending Against Spectators

During the course of the battle, if there are any spectators, some of the spectators may try to attack you. You would then need to defend against them, however it may not be as simple as defending against an enemy participant.

In order to defend against a spectator, you first have to make a successful perception check. If the attack is coming from a hidden spectator, you would need to apply any penalties. If you succeed at your perception check, you can defend against the attack like any other attack, otherwise you have to take the damage.

Defending against a spectator does not draw them into battle as participants, unless you use a counter attack skill as your defensive action.

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7. Taking Damage

Despite how hard you try, there will come a time when you will take damage. Therefore it is important to understand how to calculate any and all damage you receive. This is also important for GM’s when figuring out damage for the NPC’s you fight. All damage is handled exactly the same way, whether you are a player character or a GM controlled NPC. Lets say the enemy target his you and deals 80 points of damage and you were unable to successfully make a defensive action. If you are not wearing any armor, that damage will go against your HP. Hopefully you are wearing some armor otherwise your character will not last.

Example on Taking Damage

Bob has 70 HP and 40 PR for armor. An enemy does 80 damage to Bob. If Bob did not have any armor, it would have killed him. Luckily he does.

First we need to determine how much of the damage is not absorbed by the armor and is dealt against his HP.
80 -  40 (PR) = 40
This means Bob loses 40 HP. Subtract that from his current HP of 70.
70 - 40 = 30

Bob is left with 30 HP remaining. So while he is hurt, at least he is still alive. He would not be if he didn’t have his armor.

We also need to decrease Bob's PR by 10% of the damage rounded up (8), making Bob's PR 32 for the next attack.

PR shows how much of physical damage your character's armor will absorb, MR shows how much magical or energy damage your character's armor will absorb. Any physical damage done against your character will be reduced first by your character's PR. Any magical damage done against your character will be reduced first from your character's MR. What is left over will decrease your character's HP.

Every time your character takes damage your character's armor will decrease by 10% of that damage. If it was a physical attack, your character's PR decreases. If it was a magical, energy, or breath weapon attack, your character's MR decreases. If your character was dealt 20 damage, your character's PR decreases by 2. Since we always round up, if your character was dealt 11 damage your character's PR would decrease by 2.

Should your character's HP ever reach 0, your character would be dead.

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Wiki+ page: Indirect Combat

Indirect Combat is a form of combat where you do not actually enter battle against other characters, and instead try to harm or kill the other characters without being noticed. Usually driven by the need to meet an assigned goal or kill a target, this method of combat is the most sneaky form of combat there is. It is the form of combat you would use when hunting wild game or trying to take out a target without being noticed, but it is not only reserved for these instances. 

 Indirect Combat can also be used for combat in a pinch. You would be limited to what skills you could do, but it could be done. You would basically run the combat with everyone using Indirect Combat and role play it out.

For example, you could be exploring some long forgotten ruins when you decide to stop and make a perception check, looking around for danger. The GM kindly tells you that you spot a couple of imps farther down the hall but they didn’t see you yet. Well instead of trying to get away or trying to sneak up on them and ambush them, you could use indirect combat. In this manner, it is possible for you to take out your enemy without ever being noticed and thus avoiding a full-fledged combat, or at least decrease the amount of targets you would have to face, greatly increasing your odds in battle. However should you fail to kill your target you could be noticed and drawn into either a dual or a full-fledged battle.

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1. Rules of Indirect Combat

The rules to indirect combat are simple, yet they do depend on whether you are attacking a target or group of targets that is not already in battle, or if you are a spectator to a full fledged battle or a duel.

If you are attacking a target or a group that is not in battle then you can simply attack them. Once you attack a target, that target would have to make a perception check to be able to defend against or evade the attack, and if the target survives your attack, that target will make a perception check to find your character. The GM may or may not give that target a bonus to their perception. If you are using any skills that conceal your character, those penalties will apply to that target's perception check. If there are any other enemy targets nearby, they too may get to make a perception check.

If no enemy target manages to perceive you, you may continue on with your covert indirect combat. If any of the targets perceive you, you will enter into a full fledged battle, however only the targets that have managed to perceive you will know that you are there. If it is only one enemy target, and that target perceives you and is sentient, it is possible that you could enter a duel instead, with any nearby enemies and allies becoming spectators.

If you are the spectator and decide to attack targets that are engaged in battle, the attacked target will first have to make a successful perception check to be able to defend against or evade the attack. Then, when it is that target's active round, it will have to make another perception check to attack you, unless you manage to be out in the open and visible, in which case that target would simply attack you. Should the target be able to attack you, you would be drawn into the full fledged battle as a participant. If the target can not find you to attack you, you would be able to continue using indirect combat as a spectator.

Should you ever be attacked by an enemy using indirect combat, you would have to make a successful perception check to defend against or evade the attack and a separate perception check to find the attacker.

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2. Possible Outcomes

There are only two possible outcomes for this type of battle, victory for you or being drawn into a more traditional battle. If you get drawn into either a duel or a full fledged battle then you will need to refer to their rules on what to do and possible outcomes.

However, if you manage to be victorious and kill your target, you will be able to loot that target’s body. Whatever that target has on them is up to the GM. If the GM is using a pre-made enemy from this book’s bestiary, there is a detailed listing on what each beast could have on them to loot. Please remember that anytime you use skills you will get your skill points right away.

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Wiki+ page: Advanced Combat Topics

On this page we will discuss some of the more advanced topics regarding combat that may or may ot be used with your game.

 

1. Distractions

Distractions are anything that can distract your target or yourself. If the target is distracted while casting a spell or performing a skill that takes more than one round to complete due to action costs, that spell or skill will be interrupted and therefore not complete and have to be done over again. Simply attacking the target can force the target to have to make a mental check to not get distracted, or if the target tries to defend the target is instantly distracted. The ability, Concentration, prevents distractions from ending spell or skill use.

Distractions are not only good for disrupting spell or skill use. If you can distract a target, that target would not be able to defend from an attack by your ally. The distraction would need to be enough to get the target's attention and if the target interacts in anyway, the target is considered distracted and therefore will fail to defend against an attack.

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2. Covert Attacks and Cover

Covert Attacks are attacks that are not easily noticed or detected and therefore hard to defend against. The classic covert attack makes used of skills such as hide or sneak. As long as you can be hidden and attack, you can perform a covert attack.

You can perform a covert attack using cover as well. Cover is basically any obstacle that prevents a target from seeing you. If you can pass a speed check, you can quickly get of an attack and get back behind the cover.

The benefit of covert attacks are that it requires a perception check, usually with a penalty, to do anything about. Without a successful perception check, the target of a covert attack will not be able to defend, evade, or even counter attack a covert attack. If you are the target of a covert attack, you need to ask the GM what kind of perception penalty you have and hope that you succeed to perceive the attack.

Staying behind cover means that the enemy target cannot see you and therefore cannot attack you. This same bonus is given to enemies who are using cover. However, anytime someone breaks cover to attack, you (or the enemy target) can make a perception check without penalty. Should you or the enemy succeed, the location of the person using cover will be known and the other can go to find and attack that person.

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3. Spectators

During the course of a battle, you may need to either defend against or attack a spectator. Defending agains a spectator first requires knowledge that a spectator is attacking you which may require a perception check. During your active round, you can easily go and attack any spectator that you can reach, instantly bringing them into the battle as participants. However, if that spectator wasn't defended against earlier this could cause a negative moral impact on your character.

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4. Weapon Breaking

Everytime you attack, you are supposed to decrease your weapon's DP by 10% of the damage you dealt. If your GM requires you to keep track of this, your weapon could and will break when DP reaches 0. Should your weapon break during an attack, you will do double damage for that attack. Afterwards, you will not be able to use that weapon. Should your weapon break while blocking, the block fails.

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5. Armor Breaking

It is already established that your armor breaks when its PR and MR reaches 0. Both must reach 0 for the armor to trully be considered broken. An additional effect that could be applied is extra damage when armor breaks.

The wearer of the armor could receive an extra 1d20 HP damage when the armor breaks. Furthermore, if the attacker punched or kicked the target causing the armor to break, that attacker would also receive 1d20 damage.

The armor breaking damage is strictly optional.

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6. Status Effect Durations

The durations of status effects do not stack nor do they reset. If you poison someone who is already poisoned, your second poisoning is ignored. If you stun someone who is already stunned, your second stun is ignored. This is to give the other person a fighting chance so that they do not spend the battle stunned and unable to act.

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7. Unconvential Weapons

It is possible to use things that are not considered as weapons as weapons. These unconventional weapons could be objects lying around, such as a frying pan, a rock, a tree limb, or a shoe. Any object that you attack with that can be attacked with but does not have an attack value is an unconvential weapon.

In most cases you can simply use the material's attack value as the attack value. For example, if you use an iron frying pan as a weapon, you would look up iron in the materials list and get its attack value of 3 and that would be the attack value of the frying pan. For the very rare cases where you can't look up a material attack value, the attack value will simply be your character's Melee Power.

You can use the unconvential weapon rule to even give an attack to objects that have no real attack such as the Lancer's Shield. Being a large shield, you can't really attack like normal with it. However, your GM may allow you to bash someone with the shield or throw it at someone if your character has the strength to do so. In that case you would use the material's attack value.

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8. Aided Attacks

Also called combo attacks, aided attacks are when one ally can aide another ally in an attack, increasing the damage done by that ally's attack. For this to work, the following conditions need to be met:

  • You or your ally are within melee range of the enemy target.
  • The person aiding (you or the ally) has not went yet that round.

If those conditions are met, an aided attack can take place. Lets say, for example, it is your ally's turn and you haven't went yet that round. You are within melee weapon range of the enemy target. Your ally attacks and you declare that you will aide in the attack. You would then add your melee weapon damage and your melee power to the total damage done by your ally, increasing his or her total damage.

The enemy target can only evade or defend against your ally because it is your ally who is attacking the target. You are simply assisting. However, an evasion would mean an evasion of the whole attack including yours, and any block or defensive skills would go against the whole attack. As far as the enemy target is concerned, it is one attack to defend against.

It is important to understand that only melee attacks can be used with aided attacks. Therefore you cannot use a gun or any other projectile weapon, nor can you use a throwing weapon if you are aiding in the attack. This restriction does not apply to the one actually making the attack however. Also you cannot apply critical hit damage to your aided attack nor can you use any skills. You are simply adding your weapon damage and melee power to your ally's total damage (after applying any critical damage) as if you were making a quick, basic attack yourself.

You can only make one aided attack per round. This means you cannot aide another ally in his or her attack. However, if two or more allies are all within melee range of the target, you all can participate in the aided attack, assuming none of you have already went that round or already participated in an aided attack. The aided attack also uses an attack action. If you have more than one attack actions, you will still get to attack when it is your turn. If not, you will still get your turn but you will not get to attack.

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Wiki+ page: Combat

Combat is essentially the act of fighting. While exploring your world you will undoubtedly be faced with having to fight to survive, as well as fight for any other reason. It is through combat that your character is likely to either grow in power or meet an untimely death. Therefore it is very important to understand combat, the many reasons for combat, and the many forms of combat. The better you understand combat and how it works, the better your chances are at survival.

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1. Reasons for Combat

There are many reasons for combat. Here are the most likely reasons you will find for combat.

  • Survival: You have to fight to survive. This could be because someone is attempting to kill you or because you have unwittingly become the prey of some hungry wild beast. This is the most common reason for combat.
  • To Meet an Objective/A Hired Kill: You maybe asked to do something or hired to do something within the course of your adventure that leads you into a combat. You could be having to take someone down or having to retrieve some special item that is guarded by someone or something.
  • Wrong Place at the Wrong Time: This is likely due to some story line event that the GM has developed. You could be exploring a new town when it all the sudden gets attacked by an enemy group, dragon, or barbaric horde for example. This often also ties into the survival reason, which draws you into combat.
  • Anger/Revenge: Some other character does something that really ticks you off. This could be an NPC ran by the GM, or another player character. Out of anger you enter combat with this person.

There may be other reasons for you to be involved in combat, but those are the most common. The so-called random combat usually falls under the survival reason.
 

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2. Different Forms of Combat

Just like there are different reasons for you to have to fight, there are different ways in which you will be able to fight. Not all combat is the same, and with each different type of combat there are different strategies and rules that you will need to adapt to.

  • Full Fledged Battle: This is the most common form of combat you are likely to ever encounter. It is a large-scale, tactical form of combat where you will battle on a grid battle mat against usually two or more enemy targets. All of your skills can come in play here since it takes place on a battle map, and not only would you be engaged in attacking and defending but also moving about the map. This form of combat is typically the most time-consuming and also the most rewarding. If you are careful and use good tactics, it is possible to overcome greater odds and make better use of your skills and abilities here than with the other two forms of combat. The most likely reason you will ever come into this form of combat is for survival.
  • Duel: This is a form of combat that takes place with only two participants; typically you and another target. The largest reason for this form of combat is anger or revenge, when you are trying to win back your honor or prove yourself. This form of combat can be fast and deadly and is turn based. This form of combat can take place on a grid battle mat, which is the preferred method, or be a more scripted form of combat.
  • Indirect: This is where you target an enemy target from a distance and attempt to kill or harm this target without being noticed. This could be because you are hunting some wild game for food, or because you are trying to take down a select target, usually for the ‘To Meet an Objective/A Hired Kill’ reason. This kind of combat can be tricky because if you mess up you can wind up being pulled into either a one on one duel or a full-fledged battle. You should also beware, sentient foes may use this form of combat against you!

All combat uses the same combat rules system. The only difference is that Indirect Combat takes place in adventuring instead of in combat.

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